10 Most Impressive Ancient Aqueducts

10 Most Impressive Ancient Aqueducts

10 Most Impressive Ancient Aqueducts10 Most Impressive Ancient Aqueducts – The word aqueduct derives from the Latin words aqua means water and ducere means to lead. An aqueduct is hence best depicted as an artificially structure such as a channel, ditch, or tunnel that is used to supply water from a remote location to a city.
The very first aqueducts were built by ancient civilizations such as those in Egypt, Babylon, and Assyrias. These primitive aqueducts were constructed simply as open canals dug out between a city and a river. However, the most famous aqueducts engineers amongst all ancient civilizations were the Romans. Over a 500-year period, the Romans built around 11 ancient aqueducts which fueled their capital’s water supply and constructed many more throughout their empire.

1. Pont du Gard

Pont du GardConstructed by the Roman Empire, The Pont du Gard (bridge of the Gard) is an ancient aqueduct in the Southern France. It was formerly part of a 31 miles (50 km) canal providing fresh water to the Roman city of Nimes. The Roman aqueduct was built completely without the use of mortar. The stones of aqueduct that some of which weigh up to six tons were exactly cut to fit perfectly together removing the need for mortar. The aqueducts was used as a conventional bridge to ease foot traffic across the river from the Medieval Ages to the 18th centuriess. The Pont du Gard is one of the best five tourist attractions in France today, with approximately 1.4 million visitors informed in 2001.

2. Aqueduct of Segovia

Aqueduct of SegoviaThe Aqueduct of Segovia which was possibly constructed around 50 AD, is one of the top-preserved monuments deserted by the Romans in Spain. The ancient aqueduct supplies water 10 miles (16 km) from the Frío River to Segovia, and was constructed of some 24,000 massive granite blocks without the using of mortar. The above ground section is 2,388 feet (728 meters) long and consisting of 165 arches over 30 feet (9 meters) high. It is the paramount symbol of Segovia and still supplied water to the city in the 20th century.

3. Valens Aqueduct

Valens AqueductIn 368 AD during the regime of Roman Emperor Valens whose name it bears, the Valens Aqueduct was completed. It was solely one of the base points of a system of ancient aqueducts and Constantinople’s canals (modern-day Istanbul, Turkey). The water system finally reached more than 155 miles (250 kilometers) in total length, the longest such system of Ancient timess. The Valens Aqueduct was recovered by some Ottoman Sultans and was still the major water-supplying system of medieval Constantinople. The surviving portion is 3021 feet (921 meters) long, about 50 meters less than the genuine length. The Atatürk boulevard passes under its curves.

4. Les Ferreres Aqueduct

Les Ferreres AqueductLes Ferreres Aqueduct (Pont del Diable meaning Devil’s Bridge) was constructed to take water from the Francoli water 9 miles (15 kilometers) south to the Tarragona city in present-day Spain. It possibly dates from the time of the first ruler of the Roman Empire, Augustus. The Roman aqueduct owns a maximum length of 249 meters and height of 27 meters. It was composed by 11 lower arches and 25 upper arches.

5. Aqueduct of The Miracles

Aqueduct of The MiraclesThe Aqueduct of The Miracles or Acueducto de los Milagros is one of three ancient Roman aqueducts which constructed at Mérida in modern-day Spain. From an artificial lake, it originally brought water to the city, supplied by the river Aberregas around 3 miles (5 kms) to the northwest of Mérida. The aqueduct is assumed to have been built during the 1sts AD century. Later, the occupants of Mérida dubbed it the “Aqueduct of The Miracles” for the admiration that it evoked.

6. Hampi Aqueducts

Hampi AqueductsHampi was the capital of the 14th century the Vijayanagar kingdom in present-day India. Around Hampi, there are the remains of ancient aqueducts and canals which were utilized to supply water from the Tungabhadra river and fill the baths and tanks. Inside the temples the water was usually supplied by aqueducts underground. One of the primary branches of the aqueduct brought water to the Stepped Tank, a 23 feet (7 meters) deep water reservoir. In fact, the very discovery of the Stepped Tank was due to this aqueduct’s branch that appeared to lead nowhere. Archeologists dug up the ground at its end point and the tank arose.

7. Nazca Aqueducts

Nazca AqueductsThe Nazca Aqueducts were constructed in the 3rd to 6th AD century by the Nazca people to live through the arid desert climate. Water flowing in aquifers was channeled to where it was required using artificial underground channels. Concentrical paths leading down to those underground channels served for direct access to the water and the underground for preservation. Today, still in use by the occupants of the valley, these tunnels, trenches, and wells are known collectively as puquios. Some of the best preserved puquios are situated in Cantalloc.

8. Caesarea Aqueduct

Caesarea AqueductCaesarea was an significant port city constructed by King Herod the Great between 23 to 13 BC. The aqueduct supplied running water to the city from springs 6 miles (10 km) away. When the city was founded, Herod constructed the first aqueduct. In the 2nd AD century, the Romans expanded the ancient aqueduct. This portion tapped into the older aqueduct, and doubled its rate. The aqueduct kept on to supply water for 1200 years. During the ages it was restored several times.

9. Aqueduct Park

Aqueduct ParkOver a 500-year period (from 312 BC to 226 AD) 11 Roman aqueducts were constructed to supply water to Rome from as far away as 57 miles (92 kilometers). The total of aqueduct system was over 258 miles (415 km) although only about 30 miles (48 km) was made of stone arches whilst the rest consisted of underground tunnels. The Aqueduct Park is home to the remains of 7 ancient aqueducts: Marcio, Mariana, Anio Novus, Claudio, Iulia, Tepula, and Felice. Among those, the Aqua Claudio is the most impressive one. It was constructed around 52 AD and reached 92 feet (28 meters) high.

10. Tambomachay

Tambomachay which is nicknamed the “The Bath of the Inca”, is an archaeological site close to Cusco, Peru. It consists of a series of ancient aqueducts, waterfalls, and canals coming from the thermal springs nearby which pass through the terraced rocks. Water and washing seemed to be an significant part of Incan life, and a lot of the Inca sites in the Sacred Valley owns aqueducts and baths as prominent features. In Tambomachay, bathing seems to have become such a large part of life that it’s thought it must have been a spa today.Tambomachay which is nicknamed the “The Bath of the Inca”, is an archaeological site close to Cusco, Peru. It consists of a series of ancient aqueducts, waterfalls, and canals coming from the thermal springs nearby which pass through the terraced rocks. Water and washing seemed to be an significant part of Incan life, and a lot of the Inca sites in the Sacred Valley owns aqueducts and baths as prominent features. In Tambomachay, bathing seems to have become such a large part of life that it’s thought it must have been a spa today.

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